Learning to drive as an adult

Recent Forums Chit chat Learning to drive as an adult

This topic contains 11 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Elbie 1 week, 6 days ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #223

    Elbie
    Participant

    Been putting it off for ages but now I’m 32 and decided it’s time to bite the bullet. The thought of being in control of a car on a public road genuinely scares me & I think I’m going to be quite a nervous driver. My mum was still learning in her 40s, and never did gain enough confidence to take her test. Did anyone else learn at a later age than normal? Experiences? What were your nerves like? How long did you take to learn from lessons, as I won’t have a car to practise with?

    #224

    Katy
    Participant

    I learnt at 25. Took me about a year. Didn’t really want to learn but due to living in countryside didn’t really have a choice if I wanted to get anywhere.
    It gives you so much independence. Find a instructor that you get on with and you will be fine. Good luck!

    #225

    Luke
    Participant

    My wife didnt convert her license when she passed and has just relearnt at 34 after a 12 year gap. Dont accept a poor teacher you dont get on with you’ll waste your time. Can you sweet talk someone to let you drive a 4×4 round a field? Get a feel for things?

    #226

    Katy
    Participant

    My friend learnt at 57 after her OH died. Believe me, if she can do it anyone can!

    #227

    bobby
    Participant

    I’m just starting now at 29,
    Can’t wait to have extra freedom!

    #228

    andy
    Participant

    My friend learned in her early 60s after her husband’s eyesight deteriorated so that he could no longer drive. It didn’t take her any longer than most learners to pass her test. She didn’t enjoy driving on long journeys but got them both around locally for many years.

    #229

    pakkasham
    Participant

    I finally took and passed my test with one minor at the age of 38. I’d ridden little motorbikes for years so was pretty confident. Get the best instructor you can find. I paid £30 for mine but only needed 3 lessons as he was just so good. Worth every penny!

    #230

    mary
    Participant

    I passed at the age of 22 (I think it was 22!) but had gaps between the tests (4!!!!)

    I absolutely hated my lessons. Don’t know why, just hated them. I worked Mon-Thurs and always booked them for first thing Friday mornings to get them out the way. The final time I passed, it was the year the new laws were coming into force in the July, so I resolved to pass….took the 3rd test December, failed….and passed very early January. The relief was immense!

    That was a few years ago and I value my licence highly. Being my age, means I have the pre 1997 licence so over the years I’ve towed horses all over the place and we have a 7.5 tonne lorry now.

    I’m really glad I pushed myself to get the damn thing done, I honestly thought I’d never, ever, ever pass it, not just because I was useless, but because of how I felt when driving.

    The next day, after the ex had changed the insurance from learner to full licence holder, I went on my first solo mission to my pony, made myself drive right through the middle of the city centre on Saturday.

    Never looked back.

    Go for it!

    #231

    Sar
    Participant

    im a driving instructor and teach a lot of slightly older ladies, and it is normally ladies who learn late, either after theyve had their children, or if their husband gets ill and cannot drive. Go for it, but make sure you get an instructor you like and you get on with. Someone who makes lessons fun. Honestly the more you start to enjoy them, the easier you will learn. I have to say I rarely have anyone take longer than 12 months and often less than six months. And thats despite having no car to practice in outside of their lessons. I only do 2 hour lessons, I find a one hour lesson is too short to learn a new skill and practice it. Be prepared to have a lesson every week, and make sure youre instructor pushes you, rather than just does the same old, same old every week. i get my pupils to drive to the beach, go over the moors, suggest places they would like to be able to go to once they have passed. And dont just go for the cheapest instructor, they are normally cheap for a reason. Im not saying expensive are the best, chat to friends and see if they enjoyed learning, see if they are happy to drive anywhere. You are looking at a skill that will allow you to drive anywhere you want when you pass, not simply an instructor who will get you the skills to pass your test in a small town.

    #232

    frogface
    Participant

    I was 21 when I passed but I don’t count that as I’d been learning since 16 but had breaks between “stints”.

    My OH is learning at the age of 31, I won’t lie he is struggling with nerves as he was in an accident when he was 17 (he wasn’t driving) and he’s never really gotten over it. But, hes using the instructor I had, who is nothing short of amazing. She is lovely, everything is calm, relaxed, chatty and if she has to dual control you, she explains why and that’s it.

    I was reccomended this instructor by my hairdresser who learnt at 30ish, her ex husband had tried to teach her to drive but had ruined her confidence by shouting at her, she is now a confident, safe driver and she passed first time with only 1 minor.

    Get a good instructor that makes you feel comfortable and that is half the battle I think

    Reply Reply With Quote

    #233

    Kelly
    Participant

    Just wanted to wish you luck!

    It is nerve wracking and somewhat daunting but the freedom you get after is imeasurable and you’ll be so glad you pushed yourself to do it!

    If you can, i’d definitely recommend doing an intensive course to begin with (say 5 days of 2 hours AM and 2 hours PM), you become much more familiar with the vehicle and don’t dip back down and have to re-cover things in the next lesson. I did this for both my car at 17 and HGV 24 and whilst I was nervous to begin with, just getting on with it and having time to become familiar with the vehicle with out a weeks break really helped.

    #234

    Elbie
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies and advice, I’m feeling a bit more positive about it now, just got to get on with it I suppose! It seems like all these young people just get in a car without a care in the world and find it all so easy, and then there’s me getting myself all wound up about it for no reason. I’m generally pretty confident about learning new things so why I’m so worried about driving I have no idea!

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.